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Pihtikwe

Our Story

Listen to our knowledge holder Lily Rose tell you about the Métis people…

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Mayshkootonna (trade)

The Métis were at the heart of the fur trade. We acted as guides, interpreters, clerks, canoe men, fur packers, trade negotiators, and provided provisions to the Hudson’s Bay Company, Northwest Company, and European fur traders.

mayshkootoona 

mayshkootoona 

mayshkootoona 

mayshkootoona 

mayshkootoona 

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Lii bufloo (buffalo)

For many years, the Métis lived a nomadic life, following the buffalo across the plains to harvest and sell to the European trading companies. Laws of the hunt were created and enforced by the Buffalo Councils.
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Nishtawamiht (identity)

Symbols of Métis culture include the red river cart, decorative beadwork, fiddle music and the Red River jig. The Métis sash became the most recognizable part of the Métis dress and a symbol of the Métis people. Today, the sash continues to be an integral part of Métis culture and heritage.
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Li terriwayr (territory)

Métis people settled along fur trading routes in Canada’s historic northwest forming communities, with the largest being the Red River Settlement in Manitoba.

Li terriwayr 

Li terriwayr 

Li terriwayr 

Li terriwayr 

Li terriwayr 

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La sayzoon (seasonal)

Métis people have a strong relationship to the land and seasons; fishing in the spring, berries in the summer, hunting in the fall and trapping in the winter. Métis communities survived on Indigenous foods shared with them by the land; pemmican, dried fish and bannock.
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Kinwaysh aen pimatishihk (longevity)

In 1870, The HBC transferred Rupert’s Land and the Northwestern Territory, to the newly created Dominion of Canada. Concerned their rights and freedoms would not be respected, the Métis, under a provisional government led by Louis Riel, sent petitions to the government, and later resisted through armed conflict to protect Métis land and rights.
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Otipemisiwak (The people who own themselves)

Since the end of the 19th century, Métis in Alberta have stood together and pressed governments to respect our Métis rights. The newly elected Otipemisiwak Métis Government, formerly the Métis Nation of Alberta (MNA), is the first elected group to govern under a recently ratified constitution. Through the decades, we have had a singular focus: to build a strong Métis Nation embracing Métis rights.

We invite you to come and experience the healing power of this sacred place.

Unique Adventures

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Signature Experience

Tales from the Trapline A Métis Traditional Experience

Tales from the Trapline is a 3-hour immersive Indigenous experience that explores Métis traditional winter activities and skills.

  • Winter
  • 3 hours
  • 70 - 82
  • Groups of up to 15 - 20
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Signature Experience

Visions, Hopes, and Dreams at Métis Crossing Wildlife Tour

Throughout this journey, you will gain an understanding of the interconnected nature of relationships, communities, and natural systems in Métis Culture, as well as the significant role of bison in Métis heritage.

  • Year-round
  • 1.5 hours
  • 61-71
  • Groups of up to 8-10
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Signature Experience

Meet the Métis

Experience life on a traditional Métis River Lot through cultural activities such as art, dance, storytelling, nature exploration, and traditional art.

  • Year-round
  • 1.5 hrs
  • 20 - 30
  • Groups of up to 20
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Signature Experience

Through the Eye of the Hunter

Learn to tune into the natural world around you; use all your senses as you journey into the bush down a trail across historic Métis river lots to a 3D archery course.

  • Summer
  • 1.5 hours
  • 51- 64
  • Groups of up to 15
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